Shuri Ryu Characteristics

Okinawan Shuri Ryu Characteristics that define our style from the other arts.

Eight Performance Catagories

1. Ippon Kumite Kata - emphasize body power. (26 Ippons)

2. Taezu Naru Wazas - emphasize speed and fluidity. Also known as
continuous motion techniques (10 Taezus)

3. Kihon Kumite Kata - emphasize speed, power and form. (30 Kihons)

4. Jiju Undo - self-expression or free exercise.


5. Kime Dachi Kumite - (stance focus sparring) are techniques executed
at will against an opponent while facing each other in a straddle  (kibi)
or stand-up (shiko) stance.

6. Kata Kumite - form sparring.

7. Kata - prearranged forms. There are 18 forms used in the Shuri-Ryu system.

8. Jiju-Kumite and Sessen-Kumite - (dojo or contest sparring) close in sparring.

Undo Chikara 9 Moving Forces

1. Breath (ki or Chi) control - Releasing of air and the yell. Energy contro, we breathe for energy

2. Applied Pressure (Appaku) - Apply pressure to carotid arteries, costal nerves, hollow of throat, solar plexus, underarms and wrist

3. Joint bending (Tsugime or Kansetsu) - fingers, wrists, arms, shoulders, ankles, against all joints

4. Striking vulnerable and paralyzing areas (Utsu or Kobushi Ate) - Includes locking hand to throat, wrist crooked to chin, mirror hand to groin, palm of hand to jaw, finger hand to eyes, knuckle strikes to body, gesture kicking and elbow strikes

5. Absorbing and controlling pain and/or punishment (Kote) - involves extreme yelling, releasing of all air, kiai and kote-aite practice with partner

6. Holding (osae komi) and grappling (Ne) - marriage with all holds and controlling opponent's body and limbs

7. Throwing (nage) and sweeping (Ashi) - sweeping kicks to ankles and knee fold, kicking with haku geri, throws such as osoto gari, tai otoshi, uchi gari, kubi nage and Ogoshi, etc

8. Choking (jime) and rendering unconciousness by neck choking, striking to the carotid arteries, costal nerve, hollow of throat, solar plexus, underarms and wrists

9. Counters (kaeshu) to all of the above

Kougeki Hou Hou

Kogeki or can be spelled Kougeki (n,vs) attack; strike; offensive; criticism; censure; (P)
Hou Hou (n) method; process; manner; way; means; technique; (P)

1. Stepping thru Move forward with the rear foot (as in walking) Move backwards with the front foot

2. Circling Same as above except the moving is done in a circular-like motion

3. Hopping Spring forward with both feet simultaneously when advancing. Spring backwards with both feet simultaneously when retreating

4. Close the Gap Step forward with the rear foot as it replaces the front foot when advancing. (make sure that the rear foot makes contact with the front foot as it replaces it) Step backwards with the front foot as it replaces the rear foot when retreating

5. Step and Slide Step forward with the front foot and follow with a rear foot slide when advancing. Stepping backwards with the rear foot and follow with a front foot slide when retreating

6. Step Across Cross over with the rear foot in front of the front foot when advancing. Cross over with the front foot in the front of the rear foot when retreating

7. Step Behind Same as previous except step behind the foot when advancing and retreating

Hsing-Yi : Prototype of Shuri Ryu

Because Hsing Yi is a prototype of Shuri-Ryu, the Shuri-Ryu student should familiarize himself or herself with the core of our system.
Hsing-yi combines both Pa-kua and Taichi chuan methods in a harmonious unity. It is also believed that Pa-kua and Taichi chuan took principles of Hsing-yi and adapted them to their own use.
1. There are three main schools:
a. Shansi - founded by Tsao Chi Wu
b. Honan - founded by Ma Hsueh Li
c. Hopei - founded by Li Neng Jan (Hopei also spelled Hopeh)

2. There are five (5) forms:
a. Splitting - (Pi chuan) breaking with and against the bone grain between the joints.
b. Crushing - (Peng-chuan) to push against, press, squash, mash or squeeze.
c. Drilling - (Tsuan-chuan) twisting, turning against vulnerable areas and nerve centers.
d. Pounding - (Pao-chuan) repeating and repetition of heavy blows to the same area over and over again (fatal areas, etc.)
e. Crossing - (Heng-chuan) where the bones cross, such as strikes to joints, twisting limbs by crossing.

3. Hsing-yi system (Pa Su Cheun style)
a. Consists mostly of linear movements.
b. Employs flat-footed stances.
c. Uses the horse stance (Kiba) as its major stance.
d. Utilizes an elaborate two-man fighting form.
e. Is soft with flowing movements.

4. Forms of exercise:
a. Turning bricks over
b. Squeezing vine bundles
c. Bending bows
d. Twisting heavy rope
e. Bag grabbing and throwing
f. Snapping or pinching beans, small rocks, etc.

5. There are twelve (12) styles:
a. Dragon
b. Eagle
c. Tiger
d. Monkey
e. Hawk
f. Horse
g. Cock
h. Iguana
i. Swallow
j. Ostrich
k. Snake
l. Bear

6. Pushing hand techniques
a. Tui-shou
b. Wu wei - effortlessness, non striving, non grasping (Taoist)
c. Emptying (Buddhist)
d. Ke-chi - to subdue the self (Confucius) - yield to others or all things, thus squashing egoism, personal identity, obstinacy (stubbornness) and selfishness.

ORIGINAL BASIC SHURI EXERCISE FORMS
Hsing-Yi Chuan (Pa su cheun style) is an internal (yin) system, which is based on the five (5) primary elements of earth, water, fire, metal, wood and the imperturbable flow of chi (energy) along with converted breathing. The five elements contain five movements of force and directness (chuans), which are known to us as crossing, Drilling, pounding, splitting and crushing.
Part of the five elements philosophical theory is the notion that these elements successively produce (generate) and destroy (counter) each other in a rigidly defined system of mutual complement and antagonism. Since Hsing-Yi is a prototype of Shuri-Ryu, we hope that those that follow the Shuri way will better understand the origins of where out system developed.
Pa su cheun developed in Southern China from the Hang styles that stress power with long and short hand techniques, low and wide stances with flowing and quick movements when moving from one stance to another. Southern Hsing-Yi stress the use of the hands and the Northern styles stress the use of the feet. It is said in Hsing-Yi that when the hands move in straight lines the feet move in circles and when the hands move in circles the feet move in straight lines.

THE FOLLOWING ARE EIGHT BASIC FORMS:
Form #1 - Stand in natural close horse stance (guan ma bo) with hands at the sides. Raise up both hands (Palms down-arms straight) with a deep inhale until the arms are both in front of and slightly over the head. At the same time raise slowly on both balls of the feet.Bring hands and both feet down slowly and exhale through the nose. The hands should now be nose level and in front of the face (palms down-arms straight).
Form #2 - Thrust both hands slowly in front of the body (palms up) and slowly step forward with the left foot.
Bring the right foot behind into a left short cross stance (kake-dachi or ding bo).
Form #3 - Step back with the right foot and draw the left foot back into a left cross stance. Bring the hands quickly and with power (closed into fists) back to the body in a guard position.
Form #4 - Step forward with the left foot, then the right foot into a right cross stance and execute a right punch.
Form #5 - Shuffle step with the right foot followed by the left foot into a right cross stance and execute a left punch.
Form #6 - Jump forward slowly into a right cross stance and slowly execute a right augmented middle block
Form #7 - Step forward with the right foot into an extended jungle or rabbit stance (mitsurin dachi or tuzi bo) and simultaneously quickly and with power execute a right high block and a left vertical punch.
Form #8 - Pivot on the left foot quickly to the left into a left cross stance. The left hand extends to the front (palm down) and the right hand pushes down to the right side into a guard position.

EXECUTION OF FORMS
All stance movement and block is done very smooth and slow.
The striking movements are executed quickly and with explosive power.
Form #1 - (Hsing Yi - Yi Huo) It is performed by moving forward (I pattern) with the first five forms. Jump-shift around and go back with the same 1 to 5 forms only this time in a reverse position.
Form #2 - (Hsing Yi - Er Mu) The performer goes through the first five forms of Hsing-Yi -Yi Hu and adds forms 6 to 8 (I pattern). Jump-shift around and go through the entire 1 to 8 forms again this time in reverse.
Form #3 - (Hsing Yi - San Tu) The performer goes through the first five forms of Hsing-Yi - Er Mu (I pattern) and turns to the right (L pattern) and performs forms 6 to 8. Jump shift around and perform the same pattern in reverse.
Form #4 - (Hsing Yi - Si Pi) The performer goes through the first five forms of Hsing-Yi Er Mu (I pattern) and turns to the left (L pattern) and performs forms 6 to 8. Jump-shift around and perform the same pattern in reverse.

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